Tag Archives: history

Haunted & Historic Cambridge, Maryland

Feeling Spirits from Long Ago in historic Cambridge, Maryland

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Historic Cambridge, Maryland is located in Dorchester County on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Situated on the mighty Choptank River, Cambridge was originally inhabited by the Choptank Native American tribe. In 1684, wealthy European landowners moved in and built tobacco plantations.  This created tension and violence with the Choptank Native American tribe who were ultimately displaced. The plantation owners imported slaves from Africa to work the plantations until 1864 when Maryland end slavery.

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Site of slave auctions

In Cambridge you can still find reminders of the slave trade. Slave auctions took place outside the Dorchester County Courthouse. At the top of the hill, under a large tree I discovered a portion of the original slave block. Slaves would’ve stood on the top of the hill while being auctioned off to buyers below. This same area was also used for public executions. While visiting here I could feel the angst and tension as I explored the area. There are still a lot of souls at unrest here.

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Slave auction block on grounds of historic Dorchester County Courthouse, Cambridge, Maryland

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Grounds of historic Dorchester County Courthouse, Cambridge, Maryland

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Historic Dorchester County Courthouse, Cambridge, Maryland

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Grounds of historic Dorchester County Courthouse, site of public executions and slave auction.

The End of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA

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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
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The Beginning of the end of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA, painting of the terms of surrender in the McLean House
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Confederate Cemetery maintained by the Daughters of the Confederacy, Appomattox, Virginia
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General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox, VA
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General Ulysses S. Grant, Appomattox, VA
The Beginning of the End of the Civil War Revisited – 150th Anniversary of Appomattox, VA Encampment Weekend 07/26/2015
Rein-actors at Appomattox, Va

In Search of the Spirit of John Wilkes Booth

The President's Box at Fords Theater where John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln
The President’s Box at Fords Theater where John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln

On April 14, 1865 President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. Lincoln died the morning of April 15th across the street at the Peterson House.

John Wilkes Booth fled Washington D.C. headed for Richmond, VA. He would be captured and killed 12 days later on April 26 at Garrett’s Farm in Port Royal, VA.

One hundred and fifty years later, there are still many places that still exist where John Wilkes Booth left his footprint.  Today, you can still feel his spirit from long ago at many of these places.

Fords Theater, Washington, D.C. Site of the Lincoln Assassination
Fords Theater, Washington, D.C. Site of the Lincoln Assassination
Dr Mudd's House in Southern Maryland where John Wilkes Booth spent the night after shooting Lincoln
Dr Mudd’s House in Southern Maryland where John Wilkes Booth spent the night after shooting Lincoln
The road leaving Dr. Mudd's House taken by John Wilkes Booth
The road leaving Dr. Mudd’s House taken by John Wilkes Booth

To view a collection of photographs associated with John Wilkes Booth’s life visit here:

http://goo.gl/WI5555

“In Search of the Spirit of Harriet Tubman”

Video of black and white photographs with 1920’s music of the area where Harriet Tubman was born, enslaved, and escaped to freedom and helped hundreds of others to freedom in the north. My photographs are from the Eastern Shore of Maryland including Dorchester, Caroline, and Talbot counties where you can still feel the spirit of Harriet Tubman from long ago. To purchase photographs visit http://www.JacquelineLaRocca.com

Enjoy